My Library

As an avid reader of books relating to startups, creative thinking, marketing and life lessons, here are books I think is definitely worth a read!

My library

 
“If you’re prepared to invest in a company, then you ought to be able to explain why in simple language that a fifth grader could understand, and quickly enough so the fifth grader won’t get bored.”

“If you’re prepared to invest in a company, then you ought to be able to explain why in simple language that a fifth grader could understand, and quickly enough so the fifth grader won’t get bored.”

“I am concerned that too many people are focused too much on money and not on their greatest wealth, which is their education. If people are prepared to be flexible, keep an open mind and learn, they will grow richer and richer through the changes. If they think money will solve the problems, I am afraid those people will have a rough ride. Intelligence solves problems and produces money. Money without financial intelligence is money soon gone.” 

“I am concerned that too many people are focused too much on money and not on their greatest wealth, which is their education. If people are prepared to be flexible, keep an open mind and learn, they will grow richer and richer through the changes. If they think money will solve the problems, I am afraid those people will have a rough ride. Intelligence solves problems and produces money. Money without financial intelligence is money soon gone.” 

“The best entrepreneurs know this: every great business is built around a secret that’s hidden from the outside. A great company is a conspiracy to change the world; when you share your secret, the recipient becomes a fellow conspirator.”

“The best entrepreneurs know this: every great business is built around a secret that’s hidden from the outside. A great company is a conspiracy to change the world; when you share your secret, the recipient becomes a fellow conspirator.”

"Over 80 per cent of our waking time is spent on autopilot. We all know the feeling of driving a long distance and arriving at our destination with little memory of the journey. That's because when we are doing routine activities our subconscious takes over to save energy: we are on autopilot. This doesn't just happen when we drive. It happens every day when we are at work, with our loved ones, or simply living our lives. Wake Up! is a series of experiments designed to help you break free from this trap. From climbing a tree to writing a letter, here are a year's worth of balanced, playful experiences that will engage your imagination and stimulate your senses. By escaping autopilot more often you'll feel tuned in, tap in to who you really are, and make every day count"

"Over 80 per cent of our waking time is spent on autopilot. We all know the feeling of driving a long distance and arriving at our destination with little memory of the journey. That's because when we are doing routine activities our subconscious takes over to save energy: we are on autopilot. This doesn't just happen when we drive. It happens every day when we are at work, with our loved ones, or simply living our lives. Wake Up! is a series of experiments designed to help you break free from this trap. From climbing a tree to writing a letter, here are a year's worth of balanced, playful experiences that will engage your imagination and stimulate your senses. By escaping autopilot more often you'll feel tuned in, tap in to who you really are, and make every day count"

"The lesson here is very simple. But it is striking how often it is overlooked. We are so caught in the myths of the best and the brightest and the self-made that we think outliers spring naturally from the earth. We look at the young Bill Gates and marvel that our world allowed that thirteen-year-old to become a fabulously successful entrepreneur. But that's the wrong lesson. Our world only allowed one thirteen-year-old unlimited access to a time sharing terminal in 1968. If a million teenagers had been given the same opportunity, how many more Microsofts would we have today?"

"The lesson here is very simple. But it is striking how often it is overlooked. We are so caught in the myths of the best and the brightest and the self-made that we think outliers spring naturally from the earth. We look at the young Bill Gates and marvel that our world allowed that thirteen-year-old to become a fabulously successful entrepreneur. But that's the wrong lesson. Our world only allowed one thirteen-year-old unlimited access to a time sharing terminal in 1968. If a million teenagers had been given the same opportunity, how many more Microsofts would we have today?"

Two explorers are walking through the jungle. Suddenly, behind them, they hear a tiger roar. One explorer sits down, he takes a pair of running shoes out of his backpack and puts them on. 'Your'e crazy, you'll never outrun a tiger', says the other explorer. 'I don't have to outrun the tiger,' he replies. 'I just have to outrun you.' That's Predatory Thinking.

Two explorers are walking through the jungle. Suddenly, behind them, they hear a tiger roar. One explorer sits down, he takes a pair of running shoes out of his backpack and puts them on. 'Your'e crazy, you'll never outrun a tiger', says the other explorer. 'I don't have to outrun the tiger,' he replies. 'I just have to outrun you.'

That's Predatory Thinking.

“Do you think I'm insane?”

“Do you think I'm insane?”

"To me, the only good reason to take a risk is that there’s a decent possibility of a reward that outweighs the hazard. Exploring the edge of the universe and pushing the boundaries of human knowledge and capability strike me as pretty significant rewards, so I accept the risks of being an astronaut, but with an abundance of caution: I want to understand them, manage them and reduce them as much as possible"

"To me, the only good reason to take a risk is that there’s a decent possibility of a reward that outweighs the hazard. Exploring the edge of the universe and pushing the boundaries of human knowledge and capability strike me as pretty significant rewards, so I accept the risks of being an astronaut, but with an abundance of caution: I want to understand them, manage them and reduce them as much as possible"

"A company where the staff overuse the word 'they' is a company with problems. If employees aren't associating themselves with their company by using 'we', it is a sign that people up and down the chain of command aren't communicating - and if that turns out to be the case, you'll usually find secondary problems through the company affecting everything from development to customer service"

"A company where the staff overuse the word 'they' is a company with problems. If employees aren't associating themselves with their company by using 'we', it is a sign that people up and down the chain of command aren't communicating - and if that turns out to be the case, you'll usually find secondary problems through the company affecting everything from development to customer service"